Saturday, April 18, 2009

This Day in History|1968



Both the London Bridge in England and the Havasu London Bridge have a rather illustrious history. The first London Bridge was built by the Romans in 43 AD. However, it was only a temporary pontoon bridge. History books tell of the London Bridge of 984, from which a woman, believed to be a witch, was thrown. In 1014, King Olaf of Norway tied his ship to the piles supporting the bridge, and rowed off at full speed. Of course, this caused the bridge to collapse. By the way, he did this because the Danes who were occupying London were standing on the bridge throwing spears at the approaching ships.

The first stone bridge was built in 1176. This Gothic style bridge was supported by 20 arches. Merchants began to build shops and houses in the bridge. Unfortunately, throughout the next few, centuries, a series of disastrous fires would cause a considerable amount of destruction. Eventually, it was torn down.

The original, official London Bridge was built in 1831. The lights on the bridge had been constructed from Napoleon's cannons, which were melted down and made into bridge lamps. Unfortunately, as years went by and London's population increased, London Bridge was unable to withstand the increasing traffic over the Thames River, and by 1962, it was falling down. The British government decided that putting the bridge up for sale would be a rather clever idea. Believe it or not, they actually found a buyer! Robert McCulloch, who was the Founder of Lake Havasu City, Arizona, and Chairman of McCulloch Oil Corporation,was the lucky man. He submitted a winning bid of $2,460,000. McCulloch arrived at this figure by determining how much it would cost London to cut the granite so that it could be reused. He came up with 1, 200, 00, decided to double the amount and add 60,000, since he would be 60 years old when the Havasu London Bridge was completed. He actually got a bit of a tax break. To avoid taxation, the London Bridge was declared an antique.

It has been cited as the world's largest by the Guinness Book of Records.

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This Day in History|1480
Lucretia Borgia's birthday



Lucretia Borgia, murderess, poison, daughter, Pope Alexander VI

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This Day in History|1909
Joan of Arc declared a Saint



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Remember: Damaged people are dangerous.



Damaged people are dangerous.
They know how to survive...

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Friday, April 17, 2009

Astrology|A rough ride
April 2009 – March 2010
Uranus Conjunction Mars


Explosive energies
This influence calls forth very potent energies that can be quite disruptive, but they must be handled. Any effort to sidestep the issues that this influence raises could be disastrous, because it represents explosive forces that may break out in any area of your life.

On the psychological level, you may be much more irritable than usual and prone to outbursts of anger. Conditions in your life that you have put up with for years, even though they are wrong, now become intolerable. You simply will not allow them to continue. Even limitations imposed from without that always seemed quite reasonable now seem completely impossible to bear.

What you are feeling is the need to assert your individuality against all the forces that have been blocking its expression in the past. You want to be yourself and have your individuality recognized for what it is, not for what others expect it to be. You want to do things immediately that you have never done before.

With some degree of care and moderation, this energy can be used quite creatively. It is imperative that you release the tensions you are feeling now. Suppressing this energy will only lead to worse problems.

Uranus Conjunction Mars

April 2009 until beginning of March 2010

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Speaking of torture...

TOP SECRET...NOT!
The USA uses torture!



Check out the full 81-page document, detailing slapping, sleep deprivation, water-boarding, forced nudity (including diapers!) and all sorts of other abusive techniques, all employed by the US under the Bush administration, but denied entirely.

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Thursday, April 16, 2009

The Birthday Girl!
Dusty Springfield|1939

video

Mary Isabel Catherine Bernadette O'Brien, OBE (16 April 1939 – 2 March 1999), known as Dusty Springfield, was a leading pop singer and entertainer. Of the female British pop artists of the 1960s, she made one of the biggest impressions on the U.S. market. Owing to her distinctive sensual sound, she was one of the most notable white soul artists in the world.

Born to an Irish Roman Catholic family that loved music, Mary O'Brien learned to sing at home. Dusty Springfield began her solo career in 1963 with the upbeat pop hit "I Only Want To Be With You". Her following singles "I Just Don't Know What to Do with Myself", "Wishin' and Hopin'", and "You Don't Have to Say You Love Me" charted on the both sides of the Atlantic. A fan of American pop music, she campaigned to bring the little-known soul singers to a wider U.K. audience by devising and hosting the first British performances of the top-selling Motown Records artists in 1965. Her song "The Look of Love", written for Dusty Springfield by Burt Bacharach and Hal David, was featured in the film Casino Royale and nominated for an Academy Award for Best Song in 1967.

Comeback (1987–94)

In 1987, she accepted an invitation from the Pet Shop Boys to sing with the duo's Neil Tennant on their single "What Have I Done to Deserve This?" and appear on the promotional video. The record rose to #2 on both the U.K. and U.S. charts. The song subsequently appeared on the Pet Shop Boys' album Actually, and both of their greatest hits collections. Springfield sang lead vocals on the Richard Carpenter track "Something in Your Eyes", recorded for Carpenter's album Time. Released as a single, it became a #12 Adult Contemporary hit in the United States. Springfield recorded a duet with B.J. Thomas, "As Long as We Got Each Other", which was used as the theme song for the U.S. sitcom Growing Pains.

A new compilation of Springfield's greatest hits, The Silver Collection, was issued in 1988. Springfield returned to the studio with the Pet Shop Boys, who produced her recording of their song "Nothing Has Been Proved", commissioned for the soundtrack of the film Scandal. Released as a single in early 1989, the song gave Springfield a U.K. Top 20 hit. So did its follow-up, the upbeat "In Private", written and produced by the Pet Shop Boys. She capitalised on this by recording the 1990 album Reputation, another U.K. Top 20 success. The writing and production credits for half the album, which included the two recent hit singles, went to the Pet Shop Boys, while the album's other producers included Dan Hartman. Before recording the Reputation album, Springfield decided to leave California for good, and by 1988, she had returned to Britain. In 1993, she was invited to record a duet with her former 1960s professional rival and friend, Cilla Black. The song, "Heart and Soul", appeared on Black's Through the Years album. In 1994, Springfield started recording the album A Very Fine Love for Sony Records. Some of the songs were written by well-known Nashville songwriters and produced with a typical country feel.

Illness and death (1994–99)

While recording her final album, A Very Fine Love, in January 1994 in Nashville, Springfield felt unwell. Upon returning to England a few months later, she was diagnosed with breast cancer. She received months of radiation treatment and, for a time, the cancer was in remission.[8] In 1995, in apparent good health again, Springfield set about promoting the album and gave a live performance of "Where Is a Woman to Go?" on the BBC television music show Later With Jools Holland, backed by Alison Moyet and Sinéad O'Connor. The last song Springfield recorded was the George and Ira Gershwin standard "Someone To Watch Over Me". The song was recorded in London in 1995 for an insurance company television advertisement. It was included on Simply Dusty (2000), the extensive anthology the singer had helped plan but did not live to see released. Cancer was detected again in the summer of 1996. After a fight, she was defeated by the illness in 1999. 

She died in Henley-on-Thames on the day she had been due to go to Buckingham Palace to receive her Order of the British Empire insignia. Before her death, officials of St James's Palace gave permission for the medal to be collected by Springfield's manager, Vicki Wickham. She duly presented it to the singer in hospital, where they had been joined by a small party of friends and relatives. Her induction into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame had been scheduled for 10 days after her death. 

Elton John helped induct Springfield into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, stating:
“ I think she is the greatest white singer that there ever has been. ”


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This Day in History|1908

Natural Bridges National Monument forms near Lake Powell, Utah




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This Day in History|1962

Walter Cronkite begins anchoring The Evening News on CBS.

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Lensed. 15 April 2009



Well, I hit 99,000 miles yesterday morning with my 2001 white Nissan Xterra SE.
Running like a champ. Looking forward to 100K in the short term,
and 200,000 in the long run! Woo-hoo Nissan!



I keep having these dreams of a 6' bunny named "Frank."



Santa. Off-season.
This was inside a trashy store which had gone out of business.
This doesn't bode well for the 2009 Christmas season.
Employment figures, anyone?

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Wednesday, April 15, 2009

This Day in History|Leonardo da Vinci born

more later...

Anderson Drunk? You be the judge!

video

If he's not drunk,
he's seriously sleep-deprived,
to the point of a psychotic-break.

I'm sure this exchange is NOT on his reel.
YouTube. Where one night lives forever.

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Cooper chokes on his Earl Grey!
Tea-bagging with The Coop!

Sorry, I'm a sworn fan!
The NEW 'Slumdog Millionaire'
Susan Boyle



Yep. She's even got her own website.
And yes, I registered.

As clear as her voice was as it rang out in the auditorium,
it's too bad we couldn't hear the people choking on their obvious bias against her.

As far as I'm concerned, she's the new 'SLUMDOG MILLIONAIRE.'
Someone from nowhere, with a dream, who stumbles when opportunity knocks,
but has the courage to go through hell to get to heaven.

And heaven is where her voice hails from.

I see a CD in her future, with the signature songs from major Broadway shows.

Good for you, Susan!
And you keep taking those baby steps!

Your mom couldn't be happier...

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We're all guilty.
Judging a book by its cover.

"The mass of men lead lives of quiet desperation."
Henry David Thoreau (1817 - 1862), "Walden", 1854.

video

Susan Boyle is proof-positive that society wouldn't give this woman a seat on a bus.
Rather revealingly, almost every member of the panel here said "I was laughing at you"
or "the audience was laughing at you" before they launched into their effusive praise.

Sadly, the world is full of Susan Boyles. They could be the woman behind the deli counter,
the woman taking your order at McDonalds, the woman in the library just filing books away.

She is "everywoman" who doesn't "fit" our notion of an acceptable "look."

Also, sadly, someone's going to make sure she gets a makeover before the launch her career.
Hell, if you've ever seen Oprah without make-up, you'll get the idea that almost any woman 
can be made beautiful for the camera, if they too had three hours of hair and make-up by
the best in the business.

Hell, even I could pass for a gorgeous woman with three hours of hair and makeup by professionals.

I truly hope Susan Boyle manages to open her mouth to do more than sing.
People, like Simon, are going to be TRIPPING over themselves to get this woman a contract.
But her on Broadway, put her on tour, anything.

I can already see the CD on iTunes:
SUSAN BOYLE SINGS BROADWAY.

Fuckin' A good for her, really.
And shame on all of us who make these judgements, day in, and day out.

Everybody have something to offer.
Everyone has a voice, whether it's pen, paper, a camera, a computer, a musical instrument, a pair of ballet shoes. Everyone.

Cut the beauty worship, and cut it now.

And, like me, why don't you start reading the name tags of the people who serve you at the bank, the deli, the cashier, the clerk...whomever.

They do have names, and they do have lives.
And some of them have it really tough, 
and don't need our shit.

Start treating everyone as you would like to be treated.
I wonder what would happen to the world.
Would it be thrown off its axis?

Susan, you fucking rock.
Thanks for the lesson.

I hope others learn from your courageous performance,
brilliant as it was!

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Quote|Unquote
Anderson Cooper AC|360º
AC can't talk when he's tea-bagging!
Part 2



Check the transcripts here.

Mid-way down, after talking about President Barack Obama's speech, Ali Velshi weighs in on the economy, as does David Gergen. There's all sorts of talk and such, but the juicy stuff is at the end, when The Coop drops the T-bomb:

he can't talk when he's tea-bagging.

How'd that slip past the censors?

Even Gergen was in on the joke!

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Quote|Unquote
Anderson Cooper AC|360º
AC can't talk when he's tea-bagging!

Tuesday, April 14, 2009

Quote|Unquote
Anderson Cooper to David Guergin

It's hard to talk when you're tea-bagging.
–| Anderson Cooper

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An open letter to Anderson Cooper: Come out!

Hey, Anderson:

Come out. Please.

Put aside all the insipid gossip, stand tall, and be the role model we so desperately need in this day and age. It took the death of Ryan White to have Elton John take a deep look into himself, and change all for the better. Does the suicide of Carl Joseph Walker-Hoover mean anything to you?

Yes, you delivered an impassioned segment, and managed to carry the gravity the situation was worth.

But how can you have conversations with others who are taking a stand against gay discrimination, and remain in the closet yourself?

Your sexuality will become a non-issue, believe me. We don't care who you date; indeed, we won't CARE who you date. Sure, you can still drag Gloria out for your birthdays on-air, but you can also feel free to walk the carpet with either Jake Shears, or one of your other openly-gay friends.

You already have distinguished yourself as a journalist who matters, as someone who will shine the light on those we need to keep honest, and the stories which need a bit more attention. And, to warm the rest of the country up to you, you are certainly a champion for our canine companions, and have always been.

All you need to do is to have your publicist release a statement, very short, and to the point. Even go so far as to say "this is not a topic of discussion and I will not respond to questions about my sexuality in the future. PERIOD."

Look how much our new President has done for us. Do you think the "N-word" has as much sting? No way! Go ahead. Use it. Call someone a "n*gger." What will you get? Probably a laugh, and a reply: look who's running the country.

I don't know why every other reporter and everyone else in your industry affords you the "bubble" you appear to live in. That even demeans them as a reporter. I'd love to see a town meeting where someone, on live television, asks you why you won't come out of the closet.

If you really want to do something to counter the gruesome bullying which still continues in this country, in Iraq, and across the world, come out. Please.

You are very well known, and are such a role model, in so many varied ways.

Be one more. Be an openly gay man. Put paid to it.

And then, let people know it's not a topic for discussion, and move on to do what you do best:

highlight what needs to be seen in this world, no matter who, no matter how, no matter where.

And I guarantee you'll sleep better at night.

(PS: Did you just say "tea-bagging" twice to David Guergin?)

"It's hard to talk when you're tea-bagging." –| Anderson Cooper

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Versus.
Bully v Buddy
Carl Joseph Walker-Hoove, 11,
killed himself


From MASSLIVE.COM

By MIKE PLAISANCE & PATRICK JOHNSON
Staff writers


SPRINGFIELD - Two days after the worst day of her life, when she found her 11-year-old son had committed suicide by hanging himself, Sirdeaner L. Walker said on Wednesday she wants the bullying to stop.

She found Carl Joseph Walker-Hoover hanging by an extension cord on the second floor of their 124 Northampton Ave. home Monday night after he had endured another day of taunting at New Leadership Charter School, where he was a sixth-grader, she said.

"I just want to help some other child. I know there are other kids being picked on, and it's day in and day out," said Walker, 43.

11-year-old's suicide brings bullying to forefront

She spoke in her living room surrounded by family and friends. They had just returned from a church service.

Photos of a beaming Carl - he played football, basketball and was a Boy Scout - peered from the top of the television.

Walker went upstairs to check on him Monday night.

"It was the worst experience of my life, and I'm a breast cancer survivor. Four years, it was four years ago I had breast cancer," Walker said.

She phoned the school repeatedly since Carl began attending in September but the bullying continued, she said.

Other students made him a target, daily calling him gay, making fun of how he dressed and threatening him, she said.

Carl had attended Alfred M. Glickman Elementary School up to fifth grade, but few of his friends accompanied him to New Leadership Charter School, she said.

Vigil for Carl Joseph Walker-Hoover

On Monday, she said Carl told her that he accidentally hit a TV at the school with his backpack and the TV bumped into a girl, who shouted at him and threatened him with harm. He called his mother after school and said he had gotten a five-day suspension, she said.

School officials denied the incident had prompted a five-day suspension, said Walker, who nonetheless remains upset at what she said was the school's pattern unresponsiveness.

"I called there every week," she said.

School officials told her they had decided that the mediation of Carl's dispute with the female student was to consist of the two students eating lunch together all week, she said.

It belies the school's failure to address suffering wrought by bullying, she said.

"If anything can come of this, it's that another child doesn't have to suffer like this and there can be some justice for some other child. I don't want any other parent to go through this," she said.

Henry M. Thomas III, chairman of the school's board of directors, failed to return repeated calls seeking comment.

Walker said she was upset with Thomas for failing to return her calls, as well.

The New Leadership Charter School, 180 Ashland Ave., is offering grief counseling to students and staff in light of the death of a six-grader on Monday, according to the school's Web site.

Donations can be made to help the boy's family by contacting the school, the Web site said.

"The NLCS family has suffered a major loss," said the Web site.

Walker works as director homeless programs at the Massachusetts Career Develop Institute here. She will turn 44 on April 23, and she said she and Carl would joke of how their birthdays were so close, as he would have turned 12 on April 17, she said.

According to the National Youth Violence Prevention Center, nearly one in three youth nationwide reported either being bullied, having bullied someone, or have done both.

According to the center, one recent study of grades 6-10, showed as many as 13 percent reported bullying others, and 11 percent said they were victims of bullies.

Victims of bullies become anxious, insecure and cautious, suffer low self-esteem and rarely defend themselves or retaliate. Often they feel isolated and withdrawn.

The most common reason cited by youth for why someone is targeted for bullying is because the person does not fit in.

The Center also notes there can be long-term effects for both the victim and perpetrator of bullying.

Victims as adults suffer from depression and poor self-esteem, while 60 percent of bullies in grades 6-9 had at least one criminal conviction by age 24.

The National School Safety Center defines bullying as physical confrontations and direct threats of violence, but also indirect forms such as rejection and exclusion, humiliation and name calling, manipulating friends, and more recently, hurtful messages sent by e-mail or posted on Web sites.

Note:

I oughta know. I was bullied...from first grade straight through senior year in high school. There was an isolated incident in college when, as a photography student, I was photographing my usual muse, a male, and a bunch of black guys walked through the area near the Faculty Center where we were shooting. I was quickly put on defense, but it was my model who managed to take control, and defuse, the situation.

I'm tempted to name names, name schools, name teachers who let it go on in class, and, even, name the teacher who said, when he saw the red mark I'd made on my neck due to nervousness "what's that on your neck? Your boyfriend give that to you?" Let's just say it was Spanish class.

We have long memories, and no matter where these "bullies" end up in society, as doctors, lawyers, policemen, firemen, mechanics or whatever, we, rather I, remember.

And to this day, I'll drive by a certain place of business owned by a bully of the past. I'll drive out of my way to get what I need, because in 7th grade I didn't need what I got.

Oh. And the other "reminder" crops up every time I go and have my very incisive eyes examined. Every single doctor who's examined my eyes asks about the retinal scar on my left eye. "How'd you tear your retina?" they ask. "My head was pushed down on the sidewalk in the back schoolyard when I was in 7th grade." "Wow. Must've been a really rough situation. You have a scar. Oh, and you know you can't wear contact lenses because of this."

Don't think I don't know your name, Mr. Retinal Scar.

Because I do.

I know all of them.

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Hello teacher, tell me what's my lesson?
Look right through me...

video

I definitely DON'T get into the whole AI thing. I just know a few of the winners and/or losers who have managed to rise to the top, Carrie Underwood and Chris Daughtry coming to mind. I could be wrong. And, of course, that 12 year old David Archuleta and his like-named nemesis David Cook(e) (sp?) Some stuff, like the espumita in a steaming cup of a Cuban colada, just rises to the top.

But when I started to hear the buzz about "the kid who sang 'Mad World'" I had to check it out. MAD WORLD was always a killer song on the dance floor in the early to mid-80s, but when Gary Jules re-arranged it for DONNIE DARKO, it took on an altogether different life, tone, and meaning. It actually made the original seem trite, disrespectful even (think the goofball who remade the theme song(s) to BROKEBACK MOUNTAIN into a dance version, only in reverse!)

So, I confess. Gay rumours aside, I did purchase both the studio version of Adam Lambert's rendering, and his performance.

I don't know about you, but it's just absolutely jaw-dropping.

Still. I think I could hold my own in a karaoke contest any day.

Key of C, thank you.

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Versus
1944 v 2009
55 years later.
Nazi henchman granted stay


1944: 1st Jews transported from Athens arrive at Auschwitz
2009: Nazi war crimes suspect granted emergency stay

(CNN) -- Nazi war crimes suspect John Demjanjuk was granted an emergency stay late Tuesday to block what appeared to be his imminent deportation to Germany.

The ruling, handed down by the 6th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals, came less than two hours after federal immigration officials took Demjanjuk into custody at his home near Cleveland, Ohio.

Demjanjuk, 89, is wanted by German authorities for his alleged involvement during World War II in killings at Sobibor, a Nazi death camp in Poland.

The Justice Department would not immediately comment on the stay, saying officials needed to review the order.

The last-minute legal maneuvering leading to the order was the latest chapter in one of the longest-running pursuits of an alleged Holocaust perpetrator in history.

The deportation of Demjanjuk, who had been transported to an Ohio detention facility when the stay was issued, would set the stage for what would likely prove to be an extraordinary German war crimes trial.

"Upon due consideration of the motion for a stay and the opposition by the attorney general, we conclude that a stay of removal is warranted," the circuit court wrote.

Representatives of Attorney General Eric Holder argued in response to an emergency motion filed by Demjanjuk's attorney that the circuit court does not have jurisdiction over the case.

But the court acted anyway.

"Because it is our understanding that the government may remove the petitioner later today, we are compelled to rule on the motion for a stay prior to addressing the jurisdictional concerns raised by the government," the court said.

On Friday, a federal immigration board rejected an emergency appeal for a stay of Demjanjuk's deportation. His attorney, John Broadley, had argued that deporting him would constitute torture because of his health problems.

Broadley has said Demjanjuk suffers from pre-leukemia, kidney problems, spinal problems and "a couple of types of gout."

When Broadley filed another appeal with the 6th Circuit Court, Justice Department officials said they believe that his chances of getting the board's ruling overturned are slim.

"Looking at what's going on in Cleveland ... is truly appalling," Broadley said shortly after Demjanjuk was taken into custody.

"You have an 89-year-old man with various physical ailments, and you have eight guys from [Immigration and Customs Enforcement] trying to stuff him into a wheelchair to send him to Germany. This looks like something taking place in Germany and not in the United States."

Rabbi Marvin Hier of the Simon Wiesenthal Center found irony in Broadley's argument for his client.

"He wants to plead the sense of fairness that he regularly denied all of the victims at Sobibor," Hier said.

He called Demjanjuk's comparison of his planned deportation to torture "preposterous coming from a person that served the [Nazi organization] S.S. in a death camp. It is a preposterous argument and insulting to the survivors of the Holocaust."

Hier said that 250,000 Jews were killed at the camp and that none of the guards who worked there was blameless.

"You were there for one job: kill the Jews," he said. "And that's what they did full-time."

He called the evidence against Demjanjuk "overwhelming."

German authorities issued an arrest warrant for Demjanjuk on March 10, accusing him of being an accessory to 29,000 counts of murder as a guard at Sobibor from March to September 1943.

The warrant was issued after the authorities concluded that an identification card provided by the U.S. Office of Special Investigations was genuine.

Demjanjuk, a retired auto worker, has been fighting charges of Nazi war crimes for more than two decades.

He was previously extradited from the United States to Israel, where he was convicted in 1986 of being "Ivan the Terrible," a guard at the notorious Treblinka extermination camp. The conviction was overturned by Israeli courts on appeal, and he returned to the United States.

The United States filed new charges against him in 1999, again alleging that he had been a concentration camp guard. He was stripped of U.S. citizenship and has been awaiting deportation since 2005, after fighting his case all the way to the Supreme Court.

Demjanjuk, a Ukrainian, says he saw action in the Soviet army and later was a prisoner of war held by the Germans.

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This Day in History|1853
Harriet Tubman's Underground Railroad



Born: c. 1820, Dorchester County, Maryland
Died: March 10, 1913, Auburn, New York


Harriet Tubman was a runaway slave from Maryland who became known as the "Moses of her people." Over the course of 10 years, and at great personal risk, she led hundreds of slaves to freedom along the Underground Railroad, a secret network of safe houses where runaway slaves could stay on their journey north to freedom. She later became a leader in the abolitionist movement, and during the Civil War she was a spy with for the federal forces in South Carolina as well as a nurse.

After Harriet Tubman escaped from slavery, she returned to slave-holding states many times to help other slaves escape. She led them safely to the northern free states and to Canada. It was very dangerous to be a runaway slave. There were rewards for their capture, and ads like you see here described slaves in detail. Whenever Tubman led a group of slaves to freedom, she placed herself in great danger. There was a bounty offered for her capture because she was a fugitive slave herself, and she was breaking the law in slave states by helping other slaves escape

If anyone ever wanted to change his or her mind during the journey to freedom and return, Tubman pulled out a gun and said, "You'll be free or die a slave!" Tubman knew that if anyone turned back, it would put her and the other escaping slaves in danger of discovery, capture or even death. She became so well known for leading slaves to freedom that Tubman became known as the "Moses of Her People." Many slaves dreaming of freedom sang the spiritual "Go Down Moses." Slaves hoped a savior would deliver them from slavery just as Moses had delivered the Israelites from slavery.

Tubman made 19 trips to Maryland and helped 300 people to freedom. During these dangerous journeys she helped rescue members of her own family, including her 70-year-old parents. At one point, rewards for Tubman's capture totaled $40,000. Yet, she was never captured and never failed to deliver her "passengers" to safety. As Tubman herself said, "On my Underground Railroad I [never] run my train off [the] track [and] I never [lost] a passenger."

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This Day in History|1828
1st ed. of Noah Webster's dictionary published.

OrangeMercury
Google, Australia|3rd hit!



Sorry, but I think this is fucking hysterical!

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Staples. Not just an office supply store!



Yeah, just a "slight" scoliotic bent.
"Slight" lasting, what? 40 years?

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Brody's Birthday|1973

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Grace Jones|Live in Paris
March 2009



Damn! This is missing LA VIE EN ROSE.
Then again, beggars can't be choosers!
Enjoy!

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I love hatred.



Seems to me the younger gay generation has little, or no, respect for the generations which preceded them. After all, if it weren't for a group of rock-throwing drag queens at Stonewall, we'd still be listed on the APA's "deviancy" list. It's actually rather revolting, personally. I read through my high school's quarterly mailer plea for money, and in the back was a listing of all deceased alums. I knew nine of the names, because they died from AIDS. With few exceptions, most died before they saw the age of 30. Age-phobia is RAMPANT in the gay community, and really has no place in the world, let alone in the gay community. You're considered dead and undesirable past the age of 35, and if you are in your 50s or higher, forget it. You're going to live a singular life, more than likely with a dog.

And what's published on the internet is public. Very public. And I've always maintained that "copy/paste" is part and parcel of blogging. So, as is said, if you don't want it posted on the internet, don't say it, or photograph it, in the first place.

And for those who may think I'm doing this out of spite, grow up. I can smell hatred and self-loathing from a mile away. And I'm either seeing this type of behaviour, or on the receiving end of this reprehensible garbage.

That said, here's a "rant" from some kid who fancies himself the pick of the litter, who quotes Quentin Crisp, yet spews forth some really terrible statements. Enjoy.

First, his posting:

suck my dictionary

"In an expanding universe, time is on the side of the outcast. Those who once inhabited the suburbs of human contempt find that without changing their address they eventually live in the metropolis" - Quentin Crisp

i like masculinity, integrity, intelligence, humility. i like getting to know people with their clothes on, with tact and earnestness, like generations before. i like people who have more books read than pornos watched. i like dudes who are more comfortable in a straight dive bar than a drag show. i like the word "faggot" (i.e. "fuck those faggot yankees"). thinking most gay men insufferable does not make one self-loathing
oh because some fuckin literate dandy who looks and dresses like tom wolfe escaped out of hell in drag was a fucking faggot and died before i was alive, he "paved the way" for me?

dude, you're too old to actually believe the bullshit you spew. i don't owe anything to my predecessors who were gay, or tall, or right handed, or brown eyed, or that played soccer, or went to georgetown. there is no "gay community". at least not one most people i know want to be part of.

who will remember me when i am gone? uhhh my dozens of amazing friends, of whom thankfully none of them are gay, since if they were gay they would probably be weird and annoying and speak out of turn like you and most faggots i have met.

dude, sorry i wasn't interested back when you messaged me. do me a favor, find someone else to bore so you can congratulate yourself on being creative, "different", a good writer, whatever god-given gifts you think you possess which help you get past the fact that you come across as old and desperately alone.

actually, you can hone your writing skills write now by drafting a scathing response. just know that i will delete it before i read it. in fact i would probably suffer the faggot company of crisp's skeleton before i would ever seek out yours. and ya know what? that's exactly what i told you the last time. soooo.... remember my face and my name, insofar as not contacting me ever again, and kindly take this opportunity to go fuck yourself. maybe you need an even more bizarre profile, which i'm sure i'm not the first person to tell you comes across as forced and weird. cheers fucker!

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This Day in History|1870
April 13|Art you glad?


Metropolitan Museum of Art forms in New York City.

A BRIEF HISTORY OF THE MUSEUM
The Metropolitan Museum of Art was founded in 1870 by a group of American citizens – businessmen and financiers as well as leading arists and thinkers of the day – who wanted to create a museum to bring art and art education to the American people.

The Metropolitan's paintings collection also began in 1870, when three private European collections, 174 paintings in all, came to the Museum. A variety of excellent Dutch and Flemish paintings, including works by such artists as Hals and Van Dyck, was supplemented with works by such great European artists as Poussin, Tiepolo, and Guardi.

The collections continued to grow for the rest of the 19th century – upon the death of John Kensett, for example, 38 of his canvases came to the Museum. But it is the 20th century that has seen the Museum's rise to the position of one of the world's great art centers. Some highlights: a work by Renoir entered the Museum as early as 1907 (today the Museum has become one of the world's great repositories of Impressionist and Post-Impressionist art)...in 1910 the Metropolitan was the first public institution to accept works of art by Matisse...by 1979 the Museum owned five of the fewer than 40 known Vermeers...the Department of Greek and Roman Art now oversees thousands of objects, including one of the finest collections in glass and silver in the world...The American Wing holds the most comprehensive collection of American art, sculpture, and decorative arts in the world...the Egyptian art collection is the finest outside Cairo...the Islamic art collection is without peer...and so on, through many of the 17 curatorial departments.

In 1880, the Metropolitan Museum moved to its current site in Central Park. The original Gothic-Revival-style building has been greatly expanded in size since then, and the various additions (built as early as 1888) now completely surround the original structure. The present facade and entrance structure along Fifth Avenue were completed in 1926.

A comprehensive architectural plan for the Museum approved in 1971 was completed in 1991. The architects for the project were Kevin Roche John Dinkeloo and Associates, and the overall aim was to make the Museum's collections more accessible to the public, more useful to the scholars and, in general, more interesting and informative to all visitors.
Photographs

Steichen's The Pond – Moonlight


In February 2006, a copy of Steichen's early pictorialist photograph, The Pond-Moonlight (1904), sold for what was then the highest price ever paid for a photograph at auction, U.S. $2.9 million. (See List of most expensive photographs).
Steichen took the photograph in Mamaroneck, New York near the home of his friend, art critic Charles Caffin. The photo features a wooded area and pond, with moonlight appearing between the trees and reflecting on the pond. While the print appears to be a color photograph, the first true color photographic process, the autochrome process, was not available until 1907. Steichen created the impression of color by manually applying layers of light-sensitive gums to the paper. In 1904, only a few photographers were using this experimental approach. Only three known versions of the Pond-Moonlight are still in existence and, as a result of the hand-layering of the gums, each is unique. In addition to the auctioned print, the other two versions are held in museum collections. The extraordinary sale price of the print is, in part, attributable to its one-of-a-kind character and to its rarity.
The Met's collection of photographs, numbering more than 20,000 in total, is centered on five major collections plus additional acquisitions by the museum. Alfred Stieglitz, a famous photographer himself, donated the first major collection of photographs to the museum, which included a comprehensive survey of Photo-Secessionist works, a rich set of master prints by Edward Steichen, and an outstanding collection of Stieglitz's photographs from his own studio. The Met supplemented Stieglitz's gift with the 8,500-piece Gilman Paper Company Collection, the Rubel Collection, and the Ford Motor Company Collection, which respectively provided the collection with early French and American photography, early British photography, and post-WWI American and European photography. The museum also acquired Walker Evans's personal collection of photographs, a particular coup considering the high demand for his works. Though the department gained a permanent gallery in 1997, not all of the department's holdings are on display at any given time, due to the sensitive materials represented in the photography collection. However, the Photographs department has produced some of the best-received temporary exhibits in the Met's recent past, including a Diane Arbus retrospective and an extensive show devoted to spirit photography.

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This Day in History|1957
April 13|Deja vu?



Due to lack of funds, Saturday mail delivery in U.S. is temporarily halted.

President: Dwight David Eisenhower
Postmaster General: Arthur E. Summerfield
Domestic Letter Rate: 3¢ per oz
Postcard Rate: 2¢
Air Mail Rate: 6¢ per oz.

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